Home // Privacy Policy

Information that is gathered from visitors
In common with other websites, log files are stored on the web server saving details such as the visitor’s IP address, browser type, referring page and time of visit.

Cookies may be used to remember visitor preferences when interacting with the website.

Where registration is required, the visitor’s email and a username will be stored on the server.

How the Information is used
The information is used to enhance the visitor’s experience when using the website to display personalised content and possibly advertising.

E-mail addresses will not be sold, rented or leased to 3rd parties.

E-mail may be sent to inform you of news of our services or offers by us or our affiliates.

Visitor Options
If you have subscribed to one of our services, you may unsubscribe by following the instructions which are included in e-mail that you receive.

You may be able to block cookies via your browser settings but this may prevent you from access to certain features of the website.

Cookies
Cookies are small digital signature files that are stored by your web browser that allow your preferences to be recorded when visiting the website. Also they may be used to track your return visits to the website.

3rd party advertising companies may also use cookies for tracking purposes.

Advertisements
Advertisements are from a third party vendor, they may use cookies to serve ads.

The use of the DART cookie enables it to serve ads to visitors based on their visit to sites they visit on the Internet.

Website visitors may opt out of the use of the DART cookie by visiting disabling cookies on this website.

Cookies & 3rd Party Advertisements

Google, as a third party vendor, uses cookies to serve ads on your site. Google’s use of the DART cookie enables it to serve ads to your users based on their visit to your sites and other sites on the Internet. Users may opt out of the use of the DART cookie by visiting the Google ad and content network privacy policy.

We allow third-party companies to serve ads and/or collect certain anonymous information when you visit our web site. These companies may use non-personally identifiable information (e.g., click stream information, browser type, time and date, subject of advertisements clicked or scrolled over) during your visits to this and other Web sites in order to provide advertisements about goods and services likely to be of greater interest to you. These companies typically use a cookie or third party web beacon to collect this information. To learn more about this behavioral advertising practice or to opt-out of this type of advertising, you can visit http://www.networkadvertising.org/managing/opt_out.asp.

 

DMCA Requirements

In order for a DMCA Take down notice to be sent to you, the company, by an author who may have found infringing content on your web site, the notification should meet the following requirements:

Electronic or physical signature of the copyrighted work owner (or authorized person)
A description of the copyrighted work, including the URL where this infringing content is available or a copy of it
Your contact details: email address, telephone and address
A statement in “good faith belief” that the work is not authorized by the copyright owner
A statement by you, person who sends the take down notice, that the information you send in the notice (above information) is accurate and that you are either the copyright owner or you are authorized to act on copyright owner’s behalf
Read 17 U.S.C 512(c)(3) for more information.
Email kay@bladeandsoul.org with any questions or concerns.

In its most general sense, a fair use is any copying of copyrighted material done for a limited and “transformative” purpose, such as to comment upon, criticize, or parody a copyrighted work. Such uses can be done without permission from the copyright owner. In other words, fair use is a defense against a claim of copyright infringement. If your use qualifies as a fair use, then it would not be considered an illegal infringement.

So what is a “transformative” use? If this definition seems ambiguous or vague, be aware that millions of dollars in legal fees have been spent attempting to define what qualifies as a fair use. There are no hard-and-fast rules, only general rules and varied court decisions, because the judges and lawmakers who created the fair use exception did not want to limit its definition. Like free speech, they wanted it to have an expansive meaning that could be open to interpretation.

Most fair use analysis falls into two categories: (1) commentary and criticism, or (2) parody.

Commentary and Criticism

If you are commenting upon or critiquing a copyrighted work — for instance, writing a book review — fair use principles allow you to reproduce some of the work to achieve your purposes. Some examples of commentary and criticism include:

The underlying rationale of this rule is that the public reaps benefits from your review, which is enhanced by including some of the copyrighted material. Additional examples of commentary or criticism are provided in the examples of fair use cases.

Parody

A parody is a work that ridicules another, usually well-known work, by imitating it in a comic way. Judges understand that, by its nature, parody demands some taking from the original work being parodied. Unlike other forms of fair use, a fairly extensive use of the original work is permitted in a parody in order to “conjure up” the original.

Read more at Stanford.edu